Surfing: Coronavirus lockdown advice

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In one of Australia’s favorite countries, some beaches are closed, but others are still blocked. So is it possible to navigate during the Covid 19 crisis? Gary Nan reports from Sydney.

In one of Australia's favorite countries, some beaches are closed, but others are still blocked. So is it possible to navigate during the Covid 19 crisis? Gary Nan reports from Sydney.

Mark Stockdale navigates every day of his life. But not today.

He lives near surfing in Bill’s Beach, Victoria, in South Australia. Instead of people staying home, the opposite seems to have happened.

But he says this message is “also vague.” On the one hand, navigation is not contrary to the Australian rules of social distance. Exercise is one of the four main reasons for leaving your home, and if it is done for up to two people at a distance of 1.5 meters, it seems that this is the subject of the rules.

That – until the beach collapsed.

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To cope, Mr Stockdale takes additional precautions: “I waited until the conditions were very good. Or I would take my son to one of the less crowded surfing spots.”

Katie Stoddart, 35, has lived in Australia in Kingscliff, New South Wales, and surfed the Internet for 16 years.

In one of Australia's favorite countries, some beaches are closed, but others are still blocked. So is it possible to navigate during the Covid 19 crisis? Gary Nan reports from Sydney.

He created his own rules: he only browsed for 45 minutes, only locally, avoiding crowded places and waking up early to find clean surroundings.
certainly don’t get the best waves or the most waves long surfs, but at least I’m doing some exercise. It’s better than nothing. “

Hidden dangers?
One of the questions that seems to confuse people is the possibility that viral air travels through oceans through air.

Wind or wind on the coast. Small drops of the virus can float in the air and explode. “
“He only remembers that this is a theoretical possibility and it is technically,” says Hannah Sassi of the University of Sydney.

BBC Dr. Sassi, environmental scientist says: “Although difficult.” “Can ocean winds absorb viral particles and travelers? It’s probably not very likely and it can happen on the shore as easily (at all).”

She says there is no consensus that the virus can be transmitted by air droplets: “Medical data and data come very quickly. Every day we learn something new about Covid-19, and the situation is constantly changing ”.

According to her, transmitting the infection through close contact, either on land or at sea, is the biggest danger: “Much of what we warn about [for example, we do not cover coughs and sneezes] is to prevent the release of big drops that carry the virus to the surface ”.

According to her, for skiers and swimmers there is a positive aspect: “I did not isolate the virus in the ocean water!”

Does the beach cover the issues?
Some of Australia’s most popular and popular surf beaches have been closed, including Sydney Bondi and Manly, and fences have been created to discourage surfers and swimmers.

This has not always worked. The Sydney Morning Herald reported jumping incidents over the fence, including someone who attacked a photographer and repeatedly shouted, “This is my beach.”

NSW Surfing NSW confused says that although surfing is subject to the rules, some beaches are closed, which makes surfing these beaches to find other waves.

This is evident from the huge number of people traveling along the coast and looking for another place.”

They still talk – it’s a holiday, not a date.

He added that after canceling several surfing tournaments, some surfers safely removed the board.

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